All About Haiku Poetry

By Joanne Guidoccio

Today is National Haiku Poetry Day, a day aside to encourage everyone to try his/her hand at poetry.

Haiku poetry is a classical form of Japanese poetry that is non-rhyming and consists of three lines with the following syllable pattern:

First Line – 5 syllables
Second Line – 7 syllables
Third Lines – 5 syllables

These poems are usually inspired by nature, abstract subjects, and individual experiences or events.

Here are six examples:

Some tips to consider:

  1. Create a list of possible subjects. You could consider traditional subjects like nature and animals or a current event (Easter, birthday, COVID-19).
  2. Make a list of words that relate to the subject you have selected. Be as descriptive as possible.
  3. Words and sounds can be repeated.
  4. Feel free to experiment with punctuation and capitalization. Don’t feel bound by any rigid rules.
  5. The last line is used to make an observation about your subject. It can be an expected or unexpected relationship between the first two lines.

Note: While some contemporary poets have gone free-form and broken these rules, they have still preserved the philosophy of haiku: “the focus on a brief moment in time; a use of provocative, colorful images; an ability to be read in one breath; and a sense of sudden enlightenment and illumination.” (The Academy of American Poets)

Do you write Haiku poetry? Please share in the comments below.

9 thoughts on “All About Haiku Poetry

  1. Marsha R. West says:

    Hey, Joanne. I’m not skilled at poetry at all. In high school I competed UIL in Dramatic Interp and Prose Interp. Never poetry. However, my mother wrote, and I have one of her haiku’s framed and plan to write about it and her in my May newsletter. It involves a bird and a nest. I greatly admire folks like you and my mom who have mastered this skill. Yours are especially well done. I shared. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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